The meeting of the Standing Committee of The Anglican Communion ended yesterday.  Today the daily log for days three and four were published.  Day five is yet to be published.  It appears that the members from The Episcopal Church got an earful.  Here is an extended quote.

As agreed, the Committee revisited Saturday’s discussion. Dato’ Stanley Isaacs delivered a frank and passionate presentation about the distress felt by some parts of the Communion about The Episcopal Church’s decision to breach one of the moratoria. He concluded by proposing that rights to participate in discussions of matters of faith and order at the Standing Committee and the ACC be withdrawn from The Episcopal Church.

In the subsequent discussion Archbishop Philip Aspinall reiterated that the Standing Committee did not have the power to undertake such an action. He reminded the Committee that the Covenant had been drawn up to address just these kinds of points of disagreement. It was also stated that the Standing Committee did not have all the powers of the ACC, especially when it came to the Membership Schedule.

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori questioned why the proposal was singling out The Episcopal Church. Bishop Ian Douglas stressed he was present in his role as an elected representative of the ACC, not a member of The Episcopal Church and he desired to always be responsible to the Council. He thanked Dato’ Stanley Isaacs for attending the Standing Committee meeting despite his [Isaacs’] feelings about recent events in the Communion. He said that having other elected representatives present who represented a genuine segment of the ACC helped him [Bp Douglas] to be a better member. He added that he missed having Bp Azad’s voice at the meeting.

Dr Tony Fitchett agreed that the Committee needed as full a range of views as possible. “I’m conscious I’m not here representing my province,” he said. “I’m here because I was appointed by the ACC. My accountability is not to my Province. I expect to continue to serve on the [Standing Committee] even if my Province were ever to be unacceptable to other churches because of its actions.”

After what Canon Elizabeth Paver described as “the time, prayer and space necessary for everyone to be heard on this matter” the Standing Committee agreed a resolution that it: “regrets ongoing breaches of the three moratoria that continue to strain the life of the Anglican Communion; regrets the consequential resignations of members of the Standing Committee which diminish our common life and work on behalf of the ACC and the Primates’ Meeting; recognises that the ACC and the Primates’ Meeting are the appropriate bodies to consider these matters further.”

There is much that is fascinating and important in the entire report. The last paragraph above contains the punt to the Primates Meeting and the ACC.  The Primates Meeting is up first in January of 2011, but the big question is who will attend.  Will the Primates from the Southern hemisphere who have said they would not attend if The Presiding Bishop is invited now attend anyway?  Will they now turn out in force to bring some discipline to bear?